Col. Robert (Bob) Howard

When it comes to the example of a superiorly brave man who fought during the Vietnam War, Green Beret, Robert Lewis Howard is one of best known. Howard is truly extraordinary in his continual show of valor as a soldier who served during a 54-month timeframe in the U.S. Army. Born in Opelika, Alabama on July 11, 1939, Howard was decorated with many medals, specifically, the CMH Congressional Medal of Honor, Robert Lewis Howard was recognized for his work in the combat zone — most notable, MACVSOG (Military Assistance Command Vietnam Studies and Observation Group). The CMH Congressional Medal of Honor is presented directly by the President of the United States in the name of the United States Congress. There are three distinct versions of the Medal of Honor: One for the Army, Navy and Air Force. The first Medal of Honor recipient went to a U.S. Army recipient in March of 1863. This example of valor by a soldier in the U.S. Army took place during the U.S. Civil War.

Howard was also nominated three times for the Medal of Honor, which is the United State’s highest military decoration for those serving in the armed forces. Robert Lewis Howard was recognized for his gallantry and brave actions that went above and beyond that critical call of duty while performing military operations to defeat the United States’s enemy during the Vietnam War. In 1992, Robert Howard retired from the Army’s Special Forces with the rank of Colonel. Col. Howard served in the Armed Services from 1956 to 1992.

The men who fought with Robert “Bob” Howard on SF missions as part of MACVSOG were in full agreement that he was a man who did indeed deserve the Medal of Honor. And in 1971, he was honored with a CMH from then-President, Richard Nixon.

Over Howard’s stellar military career, he earned the Silver Star, four Bronze Stars, four Legion of Merit awards, three Air Medals, three Meritorious Service Medals, the Defense Superior Service Medal, the Distinguished Service Cross as well as seven Joint Services Commendation Medals. Robert Howard was noted on record to having been wounded approximately 14 times even though he only received eight Purple Hearts. In addition to this extraordinary list of medals, Howard was also presented with awards by specific armed forces groups from other nations. Howard was also noted as being the most decorated soldier of the modern era according to RLHTribute.com.

Because of his impressive military service like being wounded in missions more than any one person can count on two hands, Howard received a direct appointment in 1969 by being promoted from the rank of Master Sergeant to First Lieutenant. And this military rank change was based on his bravery, gallantry and specific actions that were made a note of by his superiors and his fellow soldiers during one of his highly classified missions. Howard had been hit with many pieces of shrapnel and a hand that was severely damaged but was able to save soldiers and complete important parts of the operation before his fellow soldiers and Howard were able to get transported out of the area of special operation by helicopter.

Howard’s service during the Vietnam war — more specifically — those classified operations in Laos and Cambodia, included assignments with the 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division, 1/327th Airborne Infantry, 5th SF Group as well as MACVSOG. According to RLHTrivure.com, Howard spent a large percentage of his five military tours in the MACVSOG (Special Operations Group). This group was responsible for hundreds of classified cross-border operations in North Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos.

Concerning his educational background, in May 1973 Robert “Bob” Howard graduated from Ranger School. Howard also served with the 2nd Ranger Battalion at Fort Lewis, Washington as Company Commander. From 1977-1978 he served as Mountain Ranger Training instructor.

As part of his military career, which began in Alabama in 1952, Howard served as the officer-in-charge at Camp Mackall in N.C. of Special Forces training. Howard also had a role in command at the Mountain Ranger Training Camp, which was situated in Dahlonega, Georgia. Howard graduated from the National War College as well as part of the 1987-1988 class. He was also noted to have earned two Master’s degrees while in the Army from 1952 to 1992.

While he was able to retire from military service as a Colonel in the U.S. Army, he also worked for the Department of Veterans Affairs. Howard also visited active-duty troops in Iraq during his lifetime.

At the age of 70, Robert Lewis Howard passed away in a hospice situation from pancreatic cancer in Waco, Texas, in December of 2009. Howard had been visited by many fellow soldiers and other notable individuals during his fight with pancreatic cancer. Army Colonel, Robert Howard also received posthumous awards like the Bull Simons Award in 2014 for his lifetime achievements concerning Special Operations in the field of battle.

And according to Shadowspear.com, this Bull Simons Award is USSOCOM’s top honor. This award was first given in 1990. Since 1990, awarding this award has become an annual tradition. Shadowspear also noted about this award that it recognizes those recipients who personify the values, genuine spirit and skills of a Special Operations warrior. Colonel Arthur “Bull” Simons is named for this award. Simons was noted as the epitome of these special attributes that can be compared to Col. Howard’s storied career.

And in the case of Robert “Bob” Howard, his heroic actions in the most harrowing of war situations where his life was always at risk to save his fellow soldiers and other soldiers who fought with the U.S. to defeat the enemy, will never be forgotten.

Colonel Howard may have had some of his recognitions downgraded to keep him out of the larger spotlight during those times when the U.S. was performing super-secret covert operations in the countries of Laos, Cambodia, and North Vietnam. However, his final legacy is one of true respect and admiration from those that truly understand what support our American freedoms truly stand for. And the lives of those who fought for the U.S. should never be forgotten.

When all was said and done, Colonel Howard received an appropriate burial at Arlington National Cemetery with the full honor that he deserved in February 2010. For a man who was initially trained to occupy the role of a supply sergeant, Howard became an essential part of the U.S. Army’s recon and hatchet force teams. Robert Howard is a soldier whose bravery and the shedding of his blood in defense of American and the world’s democratic freedoms should never be cast aside in shame on vain.

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